X Close Menu
  • Featured Posts
  • Show All Posts
May 2013 30 May 30, 2013
1

Jonathan Edwards was often told by opponents of the Great Awakening that it couldn’t be a work of God because “all things must be done decently and in order.” To which he replied: "But let it be considered what is the proper notion of confusion, but the breaking that order of things whereby they are properly disposed, and duly directed to their end, so that the order and due connection of means being broken they fail of their end. Now the conviction ...Read More

May 2013 29 May 29, 2013
1

If you’ve ever visited Bridgeway you know that we freely and frequently lift our hands when we worship. Some people kneel down. Some sit. Some just stand. Some even dance. On more than one occasion I’ve been asked: “Sam, why do you lift your hands when you worship?” My answer is two-fold. First, I raise my hands when I pray and praise because I have explicit biblical precedent for doing so. I don’t know if I’ve found all biblical ins...Read More

May 2013 29 May 29, 2013

George Whitefield (1714-71), known widely as "The Grand Itinerant", arrived in the fall of 1740 and "set all New England aflame with a revival compared to which the Valley awakening of 1734-35 was but a brush fire" (C. C. Goen, Works of JE, 4:48). After preaching to thousands all along the Atlantic coast, Whitefield arrived in Edwards' Northampton in mid October. After one Sunday morning sermon in Edwards' church, Whitefield wrote in his diary that "Good Mr. Edwards wep...Read More

May 2013 28 May 28, 2013
2

“Long ago, when I was an undergraduate, I had an experience on one of the rivers in Oxford where students love to pole themselves around in flat-bottomed boats called punts. I do not know if undergraduates do it in the universities of this country, but we do it in Oxford. The experience was my falling into the river. I can still remember the surprise I had when I suddenly found myself upside down in the water and that there were strands of green weed around my head...Read More

May 2013 28 May 28, 2013
1

When revival swept through New England, and in particular in Northampton, Massachusetts, where Jonathan Edwards lived and ministered, the effect on men and women was profound. Said Edwards: "It was very wonderful to see how person's affections were sometimes moved – when God did as it were suddenly open their eyes, and let into their minds a sense of the greatness of his grace, the fullness of Christ, and his readiness to save . . . Their joyful surprise has cau...Read More

May 2013 27 May 27, 2013
1

Although there is less evidence as we enter the period of the Middle Ages (the reasons for which I’ve already noted), at no time did the gifts disappear altogether. Due to limitations of space I will only be able to list the names of those in whose ministries are numerous documented instances of the revelatory gifts of prophecy, healing, discerning of spirits, miracles, together with vivid accounts of dreams and visions. For extensive documentation, see Stanley M....Read More

May 2013 27 May 27, 2013

Edwards noted that often times when visitors came to Northampton to observe the revival there (The First Great Awakening), they took it with them when they left: "There were many instances of persons who came from abroad on visits, or on business, who had not been long here, before, to all appearances, they were savingly wrought upon, and partook of that shower of divine blessing which God rained down here, and went home rejoicing; till at length the same work began e...Read More

May 2013 26 May 26, 2013
1

Just as a reminder, we are looking closely at the claim of some cessationists that so-called miraculous spiritual gifts ceased to operate in the church following the close of the apostolic age. In the previous article we saw extensive evidence to the contrary. We now return to other important figures in the life of the early church. The work of Theodotus (late 2nd century) is preserved for us in Clement of Alexandria’s Excerpta ex Theodoto. In 24:1 we read: &ldqu...Read More

May 2013 25 May 25, 2013
3

In a recent issue of The Christian Century (May 1, 2013; written by Mary Louise Bringle) it was reported that the Presbyterian Committee on Congregational Song (PCOCS), operating under the authority of the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. (PCUSA) evaluated the theological merits of the popular worship song, In Christ Alone (written by Keith Getty and Stuart Townend). Evidently they are preparing for the release of the denomination’s new song collection, Glory to God. ...Read More

May 2013 24 May 24, 2013
3

We are now ready for a brief survey of church history (from the Apostolic Fathers to Augustine). The representative examples cited will demonstrate that the miraculous gifts of the Spirit were, and are, still very much in operation. Indeed, before Chrysostom in the east (347-407 a.d.) and Augustine in the west (354-430 a.d.) no church father ever suggested that any or all of the charismata had ceased in the first century. And even Augustine later retracted his earlier ce...Read More