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10 Things You Should Know about the Protestant Reformation in England

June 5, 2017 | by: Sam Storms| 7 Comments

7 Comments

Robin G Jordan

Jun 7, 2017

The second Prayer Book of Edward VI, the 1552 Prayer Book, which was also the work of Thomas Cranmer, was far more Reformed in its doctrine and liturgical practices than its predecessor, the first Prayer Book of Edward VI, the 1549 Prayer Book. Cranmer drafted the 1549 Prayer Book as a transitional service book. Both Roman Catholic and Reformed critics of the 1549 book pointed out that the book was open to interpretation as teaching unreformed Catholic doctrine such as transubstantiation. Cranmer is believed to have been working on an even more Reformed service book at the time of Edward VI's death. It was the 1552 Prayer Book that with some minor changes would be adopted at the beginning of Elizabeth I's reign and would serve as the Church of England's service book for almost a hundred years. It is a persistent myth that the Elizabethan Settlement was a middle ground between Protestantism and Catholicism. If anything it is a middle ground between Geneva and Zurich. The continental European Reformed theologian who had the greatest influence upon the English Church for most of Elizabeth's reign was John Bullinger. His Decades were even used as a theological text book for clergy seeking a preaching license in the English Church. Clergy who were not licensed to preach were required to read homilies from two Books of Homilies, which are thoroughly Reformed in their doctrine.. As for Richard Hooker, his theological views have been repeatedly misinterpreted and misrepresented by the Oxford Movement and its successor, the Anglo-Catholic Movement, which has sought to portray Cranmer, John Jewel, Hooker, and other benchmark theologians of England's "Long Reformation" as more unreformed Catholic than they were.

Sam Storms

Jun 7, 2017

Thanks for the correction!

Lisa I

Jun 7, 2017

Phillip II of Spain was not married to Mary, Queen of Scots, but rather to Mary I (Tudor). So, he could not have used a marriage that never occurred to stake his claim to the English throne.

Sam Storms

Jun 6, 2017

Yes, thanks!

Adam C

Jun 6, 2017

In an otherwise excellent article, I hate to be that guy that points out a minor error/typo. I think you meant to write "Edward VI" in point #5. He was the boy king and third Tudor to rule England. He was the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour.

Gordon Woods

Jun 5, 2017

Excellent article. Who is Thompson? I don't believe that there is any instance which gives Providence too much credit.

doug sayers

Jun 5, 2017

Billy Joel was right. "The good ol' days weren't always good and tomorrow ain't as bad as it seems."

I often wonder what life was like for the average folks who never made the history books / tabloid / soap opera news.

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© 2017 Sam Storms: Oklahoma City, OK

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