Filter Blog Posts By:

Did Jesus Make a Mistake? Or Did Mark Driscoll?

June 19, 2014 | by: Sam Storms| 12 Comments

12 Comments

Brad Neece

Jun 20, 2014

Gary, I completely understand what you're saying, but it isn't going out on much of a limb to say that when someone grows in wisdom like Luke 2:52 tells us Jesus did, that one of the ways we grow in wisdom, not the only way but certainly a way, is by learning from and correcting our mistakes.

When Hebrews 4 tells us that Jesus can sympathize with our weaknesses, our weaknesses aren't relegated to sin, they also include our shortcomings and our inborn disposition to make mistakes.

I don't believe it is adding to Scripture to assume that Jesus, who became flesh, just as we are, was every bit as prone to make mistakes as we are. There is a laundry list of things we could say Jesus didn't do simply because the Bible is silent on them. Other than His baptism, the Bible doesn't tell us if Jesus ever bathed(at least I don't recall that He did, but you get the picture), but we can assume He did. Likewise, if one truly believes He became flesh, it is perfectly fine to assume He made or may have made mistakes.

By stating that Jesus made mistakes or may have made mistakes, in no way denigrates His sinlessness or His deity.

Neither Sam nor Driscoll were adding to or detracting from the commands of God. If that were the case, a multitude of us would have chimed in by now. I haven't heard Driscoll's sermon, so I can't speak to his intention of bringing up the subject. I trust and hope that his intention was to give us hope so that we can confidently "approach the throne of grace to help us in our time of need."

I don't know Driscoll, but I do know Sam; and I know that if he brought this subject up in a sermon it would be to give his audience hope. I know it gives me hope to know Jesus can sympathize with me in regards to my mistakes.

Theodore Logan

Jun 20, 2014

I'm pretty sure any historical/textual critic, or NT theologian, would agree that the illiteracy rate of 1st century Palestine was in the upper 90%. Painting a picture to reflect and agree w/ modern day societies is biased, in and of itself. Who cares if Jesus made mistakes. I'm sure the other 20 something messiah's, that just so happened to be crucified for the same reason, made similar mistakes on their way to the cross...

Dan B.

Jun 20, 2014

Gary- I think understanding Jesus' full humanity (warts and all) gives us a very relevant grid by which we can relate to Him as a fellow man and to know that He sympathizes with us in our weaknesses. This includes understanding that he made mistakes.

Now the primary issue I think you are taking is that you consider "mistakes" in a general sense to be either equivalent to or a slippery slope toward a moral failure. That would be crossing the line, and is definitely not Sam's point. He could have been a terrible carpenter and it wouldn't make a lick of difference, I agree, but knowing that He struggled like we do in a normal human sense is incredibly relevant.

Gary Mitchell

Jun 20, 2014

Matt, I respect and agree with your reply to my comment but you yourself make my point(better than I did!). And that is that Scripture fully describes our Savior's humanity AND sinlessness, and that us ALL it teaches, and no more, AND it is ALL that is relevant. Mistakes and/or mistakelessness in Jesus is NOT taught, nor more importantly, not relevant. If Scripture does not deal with this the Holy Spirit Himself thought it not worthy of our attention nor relevant to anything regarding our worship and adoration of Jesus, as God Incarnate!

F

Jun 19, 2014

Pray for mark, the leadership of MH and the hundred and thousands of families who are confused and hurting right now..... It does no good to defend or reject this ONE point, there is a bigger issue.... I only wish these well known pastor/teacher/speakers, would stop commenting in the blogosphere and start doing something to help Mark.... If not for him, than for the thousands who have called MH their church... But have been left wounded, jaded and confused...

Lee

Jun 19, 2014

I would like to add to Matt's wonderful explanation to our friend Gary. I have the awesome opportunity to minister in circles of academic and professional intellectuals and the argument often goes something like this: If God is all-powerful, and all-knowing, then why not "save" humanity without the person and work of Jesus? Doesn't the idea of Jesus diminish God's all-surpassing power and greatness? So a study and reflection upon Jesus' humanity, which includes the likelihood of making mistakes, is precisely what all other religions of the world (except Christianity) miss and consequently how they forfeit salvation. For a Muslim, it's blasphemous to even consider that God would become a human. For God to do that would mean that He would cease to be God. Yet for Christians it's the ultimate exaltation that God would look down upon me, and you, and Matt, and David, and Sam, and on and on and say there's no way they can "save" themselves unless I do it for them, and to do so I must become the God-man. Pointing out the fact that Jesus likely made mistakes and yet didn't sin only serves to emphasize the degree to which He would go to redeem us.

Jason

Jun 19, 2014

I do know this. Jesus, unlike me, would not want to scream and punch my computer screen when reading the comments people write in the "comment section" of a blog like this. Frustrating!

Aaron Ventura

Jun 19, 2014

One place where I would want to make a distinction is between Jesus' mind and all other human minds. Our minds are subject to the noetic effects of sin and thus don't function correctly all the time. In a sinless mind, I would guess that memory, reason, login, etc. functioned at a much higher capacity.

Matt

Jun 19, 2014

Gary Mitchell, I think you completely missed the point that Sam is making here. I've not listened to Driscoll's sermon (so I won't speculate on his intentions), but I doubt Sam's intention was to crumb (?) anyone. Following the trajectory of Sam's blog, he lands us squarely on an incredible devotional truth when he references Hebrews 4:14–5:10. The indicative presented in 4:15, that Jesus is fully able to sympathize with our weakness, having been tempted in every respect that we are, is immediately followed by the glorious exhortation in verse 16. "Therefore" (ESV "then"), "Let us with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need." According to this passage Jesus' humanity, having been tempted yet remaining sinless, is the foundation by which we can approach the throne of grace with confidence. I am a man who is tempted and, unlike Christ, I sin. But, my tendency is to run from the throne of grace, rather than to it. Holding on to the truth of a Savior, fully man, who was tempted yet sinless, willingly enduring the punishment due me, is a soothing balm to my weary soul. Holding on to the truth of Christ's humanity, seeing Him as sympathetic High Priest, sympathetic Intercessor, gives me confidence to approach the throne of grace and receive the mercy and help that I desperately need. Brother, perhaps Sam's article was not beneficial for you, but it was anything but an exercise in irrelevance or futility.

David

Jun 19, 2014

Ditto Matt's comment. How encouraging to remember that in the awkwardness of adolescence, my Savior/King may have dropped a few tater tots just like I did! Yet He lived that sinless life due the requirement of the Law, and paid the sacrifice for my sins! There sits One on that throne of grace, who relates to my greatest weakness and insecurities.

Gary Mitchell

Jun 19, 2014

If ever there seemed like an exercise in irrelevance and/or futility, this may be it. What is driscoll's and your point? You rightfully cite the Scripture showing His FULL humanity, so why dwell on speculations that he made mistakes, all unproven AND irrelevant? You and driscoll (I'm speculating here) want to crumb the Church at large because they may not believe fully in Jesus humanity BECAUSE they may not believe he made mistakes? Many people make mistakes due to carelessness, which borders on sin. What a waste of pulpit time as well as reading time.

Matt

Jun 19, 2014

Thanks, Sam. This is such a helpful reminder. What a grace it is to reflect on our Savior who endured temptation in every respect, and is now sitting at the Father's right hand, interceding on our behalf.

"For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need." Heb. 4:15–16

"Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised—who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us." Rom. 8:34

Comments for this post have been disabled.

© 2014 Sam Storms: Oklahoma City, OK

Powered by Church Plant Media